Theoretical Genealogies

Similarly, this first project emphasizes theoretical genealogies, asking you to work from one assigned essay to find another, related essay (also in the Norton Anthology, but not on the syllabus), to read that second essay, to reflect on its meaning and how its argument compares to the essay that provided the starting point for the assignment.

Use as your starting point any of the essays we have read in the course (up through April 13). Try not to choose an essay about which you have already written for one of the two Annotation Assignments.

  1. Find another essay in the Norton Anthology that seems to you to develop thinking along similar lines to the essay you have chosen as your starting point. (Make sure that that essay is not already on the syllabus later in the semester.) So, if you choose to start with Saussure or Jakobson, the essay you select could be another structuralist essay, or an essay that critiques structuralism, or an essay focused on language and linguistics. If you choose to start with Fanon, the essay you select could be one that focuses on questions of race and identity, or coloniality and post-coloniality. And so forth. The essay can be something published either before or after the essay with which you’re beginning the project.

 

In finding an essay to use in the project, consider information (like footnotes) provided within the essay that you’re employing as a starting point. The editors’ introductions to the essays may also point toward other theoretical pieces connected to the one with which you are starting the project. In addition, the Alternative Table of Contents in the Norton Anthology may be of use to you. The Alternative Table of Contents groups the essays in the Anthology into useful categories like “Feminist Theory and Criticism,” “Race and Ethnicity Studies,” “Subjectivity/Identity,” “The Body,” “Language,” and so forth. The essays that the editors list in any one of these categories will take up at least some related issues or questions.

 

  1. Read the new essay you’ve identified as of interest carefully, the way you would read any piece of theory. Make notes for yourself to help you organize your reading and response to the essay.

 

  1. Then, produce – in writing – the following:
    1. A title or heading where you make clear which essay from the syllabus you’ve begun your work with, and which essay you’ve chosen to put into conversation with that.
    2. A statement of what you see as the main argument or arguments of the essay you have chosen and read.
    3. A list of 5 (or so) key terms from the essay. For each of the key terms, give a brief definition and present your understanding of what the term means and how the author uses it.
    4. A statement outlining the structure of the essay: what are the stages in the development of its argument?
    5. A statement in which you consider how the essay is significant in relation to the field of theory, as we’ve begun to explore it in class.
    6. A consideration of the relationship between this essay and the essay with which you began the assignment. Does one essay seem to build on the other? What ideas do they share? How do they differ, and how are their differences significant?

 

 

—- 1&2 is saussure and 3 is jakobson

—-need these pages written about with prompt for paper

 

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Theoretical Genealogies

Similarly, this first project emphasizes theoretical genealogies, asking you to work from one assigned essay to find another, related essay (also in the Norton Anthology, but not on the syllabus), to read that second essay, to reflect on its meaning and how its argument compares to the essay that provided the starting point for the assignment.

Use as your starting point any of the essays we have read in the course (up through April 13). Try not to choose an essay about which you have already written for one of the two Annotation Assignments.

  1. Find another essay in the Norton Anthology that seems to you to develop thinking along similar lines to the essay you have chosen as your starting point. (Make sure that that essay is not already on the syllabus later in the semester.) So, if you choose to start with Saussure or Jakobson, the essay you select could be another structuralist essay, or an essay that critiques structuralism, or an essay focused on language and linguistics. If you choose to start with Fanon, the essay you select could be one that focuses on questions of race and identity, or coloniality and post-coloniality. And so forth. The essay can be something published either before or after the essay with which you’re beginning the project.

 

In finding an essay to use in the project, consider information (like footnotes) provided within the essay that you’re employing as a starting point. The editors’ introductions to the essays may also point toward other theoretical pieces connected to the one with which you are starting the project. In addition, the Alternative Table of Contents in the Norton Anthology may be of use to you. The Alternative Table of Contents groups the essays in the Anthology into useful categories like “Feminist Theory and Criticism,” “Race and Ethnicity Studies,” “Subjectivity/Identity,” “The Body,” “Language,” and so forth. The essays that the editors list in any one of these categories will take up at least some related issues or questions.

 

  1. Read the new essay you’ve identified as of interest carefully, the way you would read any piece of theory. Make notes for yourself to help you organize your reading and response to the essay.

 

  1. Then, produce – in writing – the following:
    1. A title or heading where you make clear which essay from the syllabus you’ve begun your work with, and which essay you’ve chosen to put into conversation with that.
    2. A statement of what you see as the main argument or arguments of the essay you have chosen and read.
    3. A list of 5 (or so) key terms from the essay. For each of the key terms, give a brief definition and present your understanding of what the term means and how the author uses it.
    4. A statement outlining the structure of the essay: what are the stages in the development of its argument?
    5. A statement in which you consider how the essay is significant in relation to the field of theory, as we’ve begun to explore it in class.
    6. A consideration of the relationship between this essay and the essay with which you began the assignment. Does one essay seem to build on the other? What ideas do they share? How do they differ, and how are their differences significant?

 

 

—- 1&2 is saussure and 3 is jakobson

—-need these pages written about with prompt for paper

 

Posted in Uncategorized