The role of virtues in my life

The role of virtues in my life
The virtues of prudence, justice, benevolence, and self –command
According to the Theory of Moral Sentiments By Adam Smith, pursuing prudence, benevolence, justice, and self-command leads to a happy and virtuous life. Smith defines Prudence as simple frugality. He adds that a prudent individual never obtrudes his/her opinion over anybody. Smith regards the lack of prudence as unnecessarily uncivilized. He refers to cautious individuals as having developed cold self-esteem from the practice of prudence. Smith’s argument states that prudence is a virtue that requires constant practising to emulate. Attaining happiness and praise via prudence not only commands self-esteem in someone but is also augmented by virtues aiming at helping mothers. Smith stresses contentment by saying that the virtues of justice and benevolence restrain one from hurting others hence promoting happiness. Smith also places value in the virtue of benevolence and warns that one should not feel much benevolent for others while little for themselves. He adds that benevolence is supplemented by justice which is the central pillar.
The virtues of prudence, justice, and benevolence are rooted in self-command. According to Adam Smith in his book, The Theory of Moral Sentiments, other virtues derive their principality from self-command. He adds that Self-command is simpler than self-control and guides one towards the ungovernable passions of human nature. Besides, Self-command is acquired and developed by making it a daily habit. Self-command also helps in coping with difficult and disturbing situations. Smith’s argument on the role of virtues in life acknowledges that punishments and rewards are also part of a functional society. He, therefore, highlights the significance of self-command by referencing the two probabilities that emerge from developing self-command; a self-commanded society approves and rewards acts of positive virtues and condemns harmful ones.
Smith defines justice as a set of codes of conduct and rules that enhance a society’s survival by creating an order. He urges his audience to observe justice, for, without justice, society cannot exist. According to him, justice entails charitability, gratefulness, and good deeds for one another. His ideal perspective of justice contradicts the reality of punishment, hate, and finger-pointing that comes with one’s failure to observe justice—Smith champions for letting someone experience inner discipline or self-criticism as their conscience dictates. Self-command also moulds one’s moral values and rules. The values are an embodiment of justice and benevolence and help someone formulating his/her management of conduct. Smith also adds that prudence moderates an individual’s excesses to create a state of balance amongst relationships.
On the other hand, justice limits the wrongs done to each other in the relationships, and goodwill improves the social life in the relationships. The three virtues are interdependent enhances the quality of life both psychologically and emotionally by promoting the happiness of others. Smith also states that Self-command moderates one’s passion and neutralizes destructive motives. He concludes by saying that the virtues create harmony, enhance a society’s functioning, and open the door to freedom. Smith summarizes the significance of morality in the community. He concludes that character is incalculable but natural and requires training and discipline to develop.
Smith believes that everyone seeks love and is worthy of love and praise. He adds that moral development begins when people seek love, approval, and attention by pleasing others. Morals are thus used to please people who approve of them as fit or not. Good morals are approved by families, friends, and other acquaintances, and bad morals disapproved. One of the characters, Mr Knightley, criticizes Emma for complicating the engagement of Harriet and Robert. Emma is, however, convinced that she is right and the critics she is receiving are undeserved. Throughout the novel, Emma is embarrassed by Mr Knightley, but she constantly seeks his approval. Smith also acknowledges that it is difficult for people to beyond their biases and deception when he highlights that Mr. Knightley’s love for Emma is biased. He, therefore, intends that the virtues of prudence, benevolence, justice, and self-command cannot govern someone’s behaviour.

Smith adds that the constancy of moral values is beneficial to the social order. By following our conscience, we end up, indeed but unintentionally, promoting the happiness of humanity. Human laws, with their punishments and rewards, may aim at the same results. Still, they can never be as consistent, immediate, or effective as conscience and the rules of morality engineered by nature. Smith ends The Theory Of Moral Sentiments by defining the character of a truly virtuous person. He suggests that such a person would embody the qualities of prudence, justice, benevolence, and self-command. The virtues of prudence, justice, and benevolence are rooted in self-command. According to Adam Smith in The Theory of Moral Sentiments, virtues derive their principality from self-command. He adds that Self-command is simpler than self-control and guides one towards the ungovernable passions of human nature. Besides, Self-command is acquired and developed by making it a daily habit. Self-command also helps in coping with difficult and disturbing situations. Smith’s argument on the role of virtues in life acknowledges that punishments and rewards are also part of a functional society. He, therefore, highlights the significance of self-command by referencing the two probabilities that emerge from developing self-command; a self-commanded society approves and rewards acts of positive virtues and condemns harmful ones.
Smith defines justice as a set of codes of conduct and rules that enhance a society’s survival by creating an order. He urges his audience to observe justice, for, without justice, humanity cannot exist. According to him, justice entails charitability, gratefulness, and good deeds for one another. His ideal perspective of justice contradicts the reality of punishment, hate, and finger-pointing that comes with one’s failure to observe justice. Smith champions letting someone experience inner punishment or self-criticism as their conscience dictates. Self-command also moulds one’s moral values and rules. The values are an embodiment of justice and benevolence and help someone formulating his/her rules of conduct. Smith also adds that prudence moderates an individual’s excesses to create a state of balance amongst relationships.
On the other hand, justice limits the wrongs done to each other in the relationships, and goodwill improves the social life in the relationships. The three virtues are interdependent enhances the quality of life both psychologically and emotionally by promoting the happiness of others. Smith also states that Self-command moderates one’s passion and neutralizes destructive motives. He concludes by saying that the virtues create harmony, enhances a society’s functioning, and opens the door to freedom. Smith summarizes the significance of morality in the community. He concludes that character is incalculable but natural and requires training and discipline to develop.